Nelson Post Office - The Stamp

In my entire life, I have never really enjoyed going to the Post Office until moving to Nelson. The staff, especially Catherine, Lil, and Andy, always have a smile and a laugh at the ready. They’re helpful and delighted when they can find the best postage deal for whatever package is being sent on its way. I’ve mailed hard copies of my manuscript to editors, my executed publishing deal, and several copies of my published book with them.  Recently, they discovered that the cover photo on The Stone Frigate is the same one used on a stamp released in June 2001, to celebrate the 125th Anniversary of The Royal Military College of Canada, in Kingston, Ontario. Catherine enthusiastically asked me to bring in copies of the book and a sheet of the stamps for their display cabinet. She’s raffling off the book to raise money for a Children’s Charity.  I love the “Nelson Lady” sign!! xo

In my entire life, I have never really enjoyed going to the Post Office until moving to Nelson. The staff, especially Catherine, Lil, and Andy, always have a smile and a laugh at the ready. They’re helpful and delighted when they can find the best postage deal for whatever package is being sent on its way. I’ve mailed hard copies of my manuscript to editors, my executed publishing deal, and several copies of my published book with them.

Recently, they discovered that the cover photo on The Stone Frigate is the same one used on a stamp released in June 2001, to celebrate the 125th Anniversary of The Royal Military College of Canada, in Kingston, Ontario. Catherine enthusiastically asked me to bring in copies of the book and a sheet of the stamps for their display cabinet. She’s raffling off the book to raise money for a Children’s Charity.

I love the “Nelson Lady” sign!! xo

Here’s a copy of the original photo taken during my road trip to NDHQ, as described in The Stone Frigate on page 205 in Chapter 26 - Second Chances.

Here’s a copy of the original photo taken during my road trip to NDHQ, as described in The Stone Frigate on page 205 in Chapter 26 - Second Chances.

Early 2001, I received a phone call from one of the members of the RMC Historical Society, who knew me well, advising that he had just reviewed the large proof for an upcoming stamp design scheduled to be released in June of that year to celebrate RMC’s 125th Anniversary.  “You’ll never guess who’s likeness is used to portray the female cadet,” he said.  He was right. I never could have guessed that it would be me, undoubtedly by the happenstance of having my photo taken for the College clothing stores catalogue in 1982. The photo was chosen from the RMC Archives.  Here are the full specs as detailed on the Canada Post Website:

Early 2001, I received a phone call from one of the members of the RMC Historical Society, who knew me well, advising that he had just reviewed the large proof for an upcoming stamp design scheduled to be released in June of that year to celebrate RMC’s 125th Anniversary.

“You’ll never guess who’s likeness is used to portray the female cadet,” he said.

He was right. I never could have guessed that it would be me, undoubtedly by the happenstance of having my photo taken for the College clothing stores catalogue in 1982. The photo was chosen from the RMC Archives.

Here are the full specs as detailed on the Canada Post Website:

Royal Military College of Canada

Posted on June 01, 2001 by Canada Post Organization in Latest Stamps

Since it first opened its doors in 1876, The Royal Military College of Canada has been the training ground for the cream of Canada's military elite. Some of those who passed through its gates went on to fight in two world wars and the Korean War, some travelled to other countries to uphold freedom and democracy, while some even travelled to the far reaches of space.   Laying the foundation    The founding of The Royal Military College (RMC), goes back to the withdrawal of most British troops from Canada shortly after confederation. It was decided that instead of sending candidates to England for training, a facility would be set up to teach everything from military tactics to the sciences. Chosen because of its strong ties to past military and naval activity, Kingston was destined to become the home of the RMC and its first enrolees, the "Old Eighteen."  The winds of war    During the First World War over 900 graduates of RMC went to war, serving with either British or Canadian forces overseas. In 1939, during the Second World War the RMC once again sent its finest into the battle, and of the 1,358 ex-cadets who served, 114 would never return. During The Second World War, several RMC graduates played key roles in the Allied victory, including General Henry Crerar, commander of the 1st Canadian Army.  Still on duty    Today the RMC is Canada's only remaining military college, living up to its motto of "Truth-Duty-Valour." State-of-the-art training keeps candidates up to date on the latest technological advances.  At ease with the artist    With a father in the Canadian military, artist Jim Hudson was the perfect choice for designing a stamp to commemorate 125 years of the RMC's existence. Reflecting the RMC's traditions of precision and balance, Jim's design personifies the history, the courage and the pageantry of those who attended one of Canada's most revered military establishment. An award-winning member of the Society of Graphic Designers of Canada, Jim Hudson has put together a stamp that is more than just a collection of images. He has given us reminder of the past and of those who gave their all to defend freedom.  Stamp Specifications   Denomination:  1 x 47¢   Design:  Jim Hudson   Dimensions:  48 mm x 26 mm (horizontal)   Gum Type:  P.V.A.   Paper Type:  Tullis Russell Coatings   Perforations:  13+   Printer:  Canadian Bank Note   Printing Process:  Lithography (4 colours)   Tagging:  General, four sides   Quantity:  5,000,000

Since it first opened its doors in 1876, The Royal Military College of Canada has been the training ground for the cream of Canada's military elite. Some of those who passed through its gates went on to fight in two world wars and the Korean War, some travelled to other countries to uphold freedom and democracy, while some even travelled to the far reaches of space.

Laying the foundation

The founding of The Royal Military College (RMC), goes back to the withdrawal of most British troops from Canada shortly after confederation. It was decided that instead of sending candidates to England for training, a facility would be set up to teach everything from military tactics to the sciences. Chosen because of its strong ties to past military and naval activity, Kingston was destined to become the home of the RMC and its first enrolees, the "Old Eighteen." The winds of war

During the First World War over 900 graduates of RMC went to war, serving with either British or Canadian forces overseas. In 1939, during the Second World War the RMC once again sent its finest into the battle, and of the 1,358 ex-cadets who served, 114 would never return. During The Second World War, several RMC graduates played key roles in the Allied victory, including General Henry Crerar, commander of the 1st Canadian Army. Still on duty

Today the RMC is Canada's only remaining military college, living up to its motto of "Truth-Duty-Valour." State-of-the-art training keeps candidates up to date on the latest technological advances. At ease with the artist

With a father in the Canadian military, artist Jim Hudson was the perfect choice for designing a stamp to commemorate 125 years of the RMC's existence. Reflecting the RMC's traditions of precision and balance, Jim's design personifies the history, the courage and the pageantry of those who attended one of Canada's most revered military establishment. An award-winning member of the Society of Graphic Designers of Canada, Jim Hudson has put together a stamp that is more than just a collection of images. He has given us reminder of the past and of those who gave their all to defend freedom.

Stamp Specifications

Denomination: 1 x 47¢

Design: Jim Hudson

Dimensions: 48 mm x 26 mm (horizontal)

Gum Type: P.V.A.

Paper Type: Tullis Russell Coatings

Perforations: 13+

Printer: Canadian Bank Note

Printing Process: Lithography (4 colours)

Tagging: General, four sides

Quantity: 5,000,000

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